Greyfang

I am an absolute bibliophile.  Reading is something that i might not take time for everyday, but has been a part of my life ever since i was very young.  Science fiction and fantasy have always been my favorite genres, but i've read some fantastic works in other genres as well, from biographies to scientific journals.  I was a member of the Science Fiction Bookclub (through Waldenbooks) when i was 9 years old, and also a subscriber to Dragon magazine.  I remember undertaking Tolkien's The Hobbit shortly thereafter, and even delved into such works as Asimov's The Foundation Series when i was still pretty young.  I easily become enthralled in a well-developed narrative and realistic characterization, regardless of the genre.

I am reading Dust of Dreams, the ninth novel from the Malazan Book of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson.

If you're wanting more info on the books i've previously read, below are some of the most memorable.

My Books

     Series

The Hobbit & The Lord of the Rings trilogy (and other Middle Earth works like Farmer Giles of Ham, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Smith of Wootton Major, The Silmarillion, and The Children of Húrin) - J. R. R. Tolkien
The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress, To Sail Beyond The Sunset, The Number Of The Beast, Time Enough For Love, Stranger In A Strange Land, and many other works from his collective universes - Robert A. Heinlein
The Dark Tower Series - Stephen King
The Foundation Series - Isaac Asimov
The Yaqui Way Of Knowledge trilogy - Carlos Castaneda
The Elric Saga - Michael Moorcock
The Sword of Shannara trilogy - Terry Brooks
The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy series - Douglas Adams
Tales of the Otori series - Lian Hearn
The Song of Ice and Fire series - George R. R. Martin
The Dune series (original four books) - Frank Herbert
The Apprentice Adept trilogy, The Incarnations of Immortality series, and the first 13 installments of the Xanth series - Piers Anthony
The 1st & 2nd Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever - Stephen R. Donaldson
The Icewind Dale Trilogy and The Dark Elf Trilogy - R. A. Salvatore
The Dragonriders of Pern trilogy - Anne McAffrey
The Kingkiller Chronicles and The Slow Regard of Silent Things - Patrick Rothfuss
The Night's Dawn trilogy - Peter F. Hamilton (first 2 novels, haven't started The Naked God yet)
The Dresden Files - Jim Butcher (first 4 novels so far, taking a break from them for a bit)
The Malazan Book of the Fallen saga (first eight novels) and The Collected Tales of Bauchelain & Korbal Broach - Steven Erikson
The Novels of the Malazan Empire series (first three novels) - Ian C. Esslemont

     Individual editions

Armada and Ready Player One - Ernest Cline
The Last Unicorn - Peter S. Beagle
Redshirts - John Scalzi
American Gods - Neil Gaiman
The Stolen Child - Keith Donahue
The City of Dreaming Books - Walter Moers
Johnathan Strange and M Norrell - Susana Clarke
The Road - Cormac McCarthy
Fight Club and Rant - Chuck Palahniuk
Water for Elephants - Sara Gruen
The Book of Lost Things - John Connolly
Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Batman: Year One, Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again, Ronin, 300, and Daredevil: Born Again - Frank Miller
Ender's Game - Orson Scott Card
The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe - C. S. Lewis
Watership Down - Richard Adams
One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel García Márquez
Things Fall Apart - Chinua Achebe
Light in August and The Bear - William Faulkner
The Plague - Albert Camus
The Metamorphosis - Franz Kafka
Pygmalion - George Bernard Shaw
The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde
The Princess Bride - William Goldman
Interview With the Vampire - Anne Rice
The Mists of Avalon - Marion Zimmer Bradley
A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
The Little Prince - Antoine de Saint-Exupery
Johnathan Livingston Seagull, There's No Such Place As Far Away, and Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah - Richard Bach
The Martian Chronicles, Fahrenheit 451, and Something Wicked This Way Comes - Ray Bradbury
To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee
1984 and Animal Farm - George Orwell
2001: A Space Odyssey - Arthur C. Clarke
I, Robot and Robot Dreams - Isaac Asimov
Murder On The Orient Express, The A.B.C. Murders, and And Then There Were None (Ten Little Indians) - Dame Agatha Christie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and A Scanner Darkly - Philip K. Dick
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, and The Shape Of Things To Come - H. G. Wells
A Journey to the Center of the Earth, Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea, and Around The World in Eighty Days - Jules Verne
Slaughterhouse-Five - Kurt Vonnegut
The Tell-Tale Heart, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Raven - Edgar Allan Poe
The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller
The Pearl - John Steinbeck
To The Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf
On the Road - Jack Kerouac
Naked Lunch - William S. Burroughs
The Catcher in the Rye - J. D. Salinger
Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - Ken Kesey
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values - Robert M. Pirsig
The Art of War - Sun Tzu
Tao Te Ching - Lao Tzu
The Stand - Stephen King
The Talisman - Stephen King & Peter Straub

     Collections

Sin City novels, 300, Batman: Year One, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again, Daredevil: The Man Without Fear, and Spawn/Batman (with Todd McFarlane) - Frank Miller
Watchmen - Alan Moore
The Complete Book of Swords - Fred Saberhagen
Masterpieces: The Best Science Fiction of the 20th Century - various authors
The Jungle Book - Rudyard Kipling
I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream and Dream Corridor (various installments) - Harland Ellison
Black Seas of Infinity - H. P. Lovecraft
Rogues - edited by George R. R. Martin
The Sandman - Neil Gaiman and multiple artists (just Preludes and Nocturnes so far, but will continue)

I read novels with the utmost pertinacity. I look upon them - I look upon good novels - as a very valuable part of literature, conveying more exact and finely-distinguished knowledge of the human heart and mind than almost any other, with greater breadth and depth and fewer constraints.  --  Patrick O'Brian